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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Drivers side quarter panel welded on. Sprayed some zinc primer to protect it until paint. All 4 brakes are now rebuilt and bled! Just got to adjust the handbrake and then we're done for the brakes!



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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Replaced the CAS seal and the rocker cover gasket!
The black 5 is still for sale if anyone wants a freshly restored NA







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Repair panels (unless genuine OEM) aren't intended to be used as is. If you cut the front edge back to the face of the quarter panel, you'll be able to keep the original lines of the door shuts and save blowing the panel gaps.

10mm of filler in a corner susceptible to knocks is only going to end in disaster somewhere down the line. Steel adds value IMO, filler only adds risk and questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Repair panels (unless genuine OEM) aren't intended to be used as is. If you cut the front edge back to the face of the quarter panel, you'll be able to keep the original lines of the door shuts and save blowing the panel gaps.

10mm of filler in a corner susceptible to knocks is only going to end in disaster somewhere down the line. Steel adds value IMO, filler only adds risk and questions.
Gotcha! Funnily enough, we had that epiphany only a few days ago! Not too sure where to cut it on the door side yet since it has the inbuilt line that follows the door, I'm assuming we'd cut it right on the edge so the weld can be filled
 

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I'd only ever look to replace what gets you back to clean steel while making the welds blend well. The e coated original steel is better quality than the stuff replacement panels are made of, even though it is zinc coated.

I'd say always try keep the welds on the flat face of the panel or at least in areas with the least detail where you can get at them with a linishing wheel. Keep the original bends, swages and features wherever you can. The further you can stay away from the detail, the better chance you have of blending it all together.

Keeping original details like the panel overlap on the sill would be high on my priorities too. I use a bit of copper flat bar as a heatsink next to the edge to keep the joint crisp when butt jointing sill repair panels in to save having to try grind/file/chisel the edge back sharp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I'd only ever look to replace what gets you back to clean steel while making the welds blend well. The e coated original steel is better quality than the stuff replacement panels are made of, even though it is zinc coated.

I'd say always try keep the welds on the flat face of the panel or at least in areas with the least detail where you can get at them with a linishing wheel. Keep the original bends, swages and features wherever you can. The further you can stay away from the detail, the better chance you have of blending it all together.

Keeping original details like the panel overlap on the sill would be high on my priorities too. I use a bit of copper flat bar as a heatsink next to the edge to keep the joint crisp when butt jointing sill repair panels in to save having to try grind/file/chisel the edge back sharp.
Thank you for the tips man!

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Always good to see discussion and hints/tips shared especially with the dark-arts of hot glue throwing:cool:

only ever look to replace what gets you back to clean steel while making the welds blend well
^This.

the e coated original steel is better quality than the stuff replacement panels are made of, even though it is zinc coated.
^^THIS (y)

I'd say always try keep the welds on the flat face of the panel or at least in areas with the least detail
yes & no:unsure:

I would join an arch section on or near the inside radius of the flare as this allows a butt-joint if you're unsure of warpage and is easy to blend or fill (polyester/talc filler or leadloading) the radius as opposed to a sheet of filler over a large flat area.

although most of my external or visable panel welds are butt-joints...

Keeping original details like the panel overlap on the sill would be high on my priorities too.
^^This(y)

I use a bit of copper flat bar as a heatsink
I use brass, bronze or gunmetal depending on whats available / closest, good as heatsink and also can be used behind panels to stop puddlewelds 'falling' through (if filling a screw-hole for example)

Rich.
 
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