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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the process of getting very frustrated with the internet and my lack of findings for short welding courses in or around portsmouth.
What i want to do is find someone who can teach me the basics that will enable me to practice a little and further go on to being able to fix rusted sills on cars etc.

I will pay anyone who can offer me this training although really id like someone to suggest somewhere i can go to train to actually get some form of certification.

So any ideas or offers welcomed.
Cheers
Nick
 

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Welding course are next to non existent If it's not on the government's list of approved course it's not allowed to exist (google any college prospectus they all offer exactly the same mundane courses). Personnel/training person has been trying to find me a short course for years (along with a machine shop competency course so I can have a certificate, this course used to exist) and this is in Cambridge FFS.
 

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the cheapest way to teach yourself to weld is to read, then have a go. it's how i've done it and i'd say i'm.....not bad

join a welding forum and absorb all you can. welding supplies and steel are cheap enough to keep trying.

most importantly, while you're trying to learn, make sure everything's clean. don't practice on shitty rusty old panels. learn on new stuff otherwise you'll never know when you've buggered up or you've got some shite in your weld.

about the only courses you'll find round here....in the industrial north.... are for full coded welder type courses. hundreds of pounds and not really beginner focused.
tom
 

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you might have more luck trying to enrol on a car body course, which may cover welding,

most out n out welding courses would be no good for car body repair, its generally heavier duty or thicker walled materials, which if you learn on are a world apart from sticking a new sill on,

you would mead to decide which welding would be of more use to you too, ie- mig, tig, mma, or oxy acetylene,
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
so whats best setup for doing car repairs and exhaust/intake fabrication type things.. the odd metal bracket here and there ?
 

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IMO (and with some basic welding experience from college, uni, and general DIY) there's a little bit to learn about welding, but there is a whole lot of practice! my advice would be to buy a good book and some metal stock, and practice, practice, practice. Once you've regonised how to strike and maintain a good arc, the rest is down to a steady hand.

For most car based stuff MIG is simpler and easier than arc welding (never tried TIG). Arc welding is great for Chassis work and big lumps of metal but is absolutely no good for body panel repair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sounds interesting
so probably mig then.
Is this any good on stainless as i've heard in the past id need tig
 

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Skuzz - if only you lived up here in the North West mate, I'd willingly show you the ropes. For sills you'd be best off with a HF TIG inverter. TIG (Tungsten, Inert-Gas) is very much like welding with oxy/acetylene except with the advantage of having a lot more control over the weld pool, localised heat/weld pool, less oxidation & no molten steel spitting down your shirt/boots


I use 1mm 316L (stainless) filler wire whenever welding corroded mild steel, it's a damn site easier to fuse.

If you want any hints from afar, don't hesitate to PM me
 

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I'm in the same situation - had a look around and found jack-all by the way of welding courses on offer. I've bought myself a MIG welder - then promptly moved house and lost my garage...

But my intentions are, when I get some space again, to spend a weekend consulting books and wrecking bits of steel, hopefully with the supervision and assistance of a friend who can do a bit of welding. I think self-tuition and experimentation are our best hope.
 

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hmm i was thinking about looking for a welding evening course. looks like i needn't even bother with that. just have to find a friendly local welding man and throw some hard earned at them then
 

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I'd love to learn to weld - there's plenty of books and some useful stuff on Youtube, I'll have to have a look at these welding forums - never thought of that!

I've not been able to find any courses, so I guess, like a couple of others have said, there's no real choice than to get the kit and practice

So, Mig for body work etc and Tig for aluminium fabrication? I'm also struggling at the moment with what would be the right basics to buy first - I don't want to have to upgrade the equipment and I'd like it to be reasonably portable, anyone got any ideas?

My link Just found this and looks a good place to start
 

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Use TIG for everything - forget about the MIG, you'll only end up blowing holes all over the place.......besides, mild steel & stainless steel can both be easily welded without having to set up with different reels etc.

FFS just forget about aluminium......it's a completely different ball game.
 

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but tig needs a bottle of pure argon and unless you're made of money, that means rental contracts and a hefty bottle, even with one of the little ones.

i reckon a lot of people would shit themselves if sat in front of a tig set and manage nothing more than touching the tungsten down and spending all their time regrinding the tip.

a mig set is less suited to bodywork, but isn't unsuitable. it's a LOT more accessible to a beginner, with fewer, cheaper consumables.

i personally can't wait to get a tig set but i half know what i'm up to with one and know mig well
tom
 

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but tig needs a bottle of pure argon and unless you're made of money, that means rental contracts and a hefty bottle, even with one of the little ones.

i reckon a lot of people would shit themselves if sat in front of a tig set and manage nothing more than touching the tungsten down and spending all their time regrinding the tip.

a mig set is less suited to bodywork, but isn't unsuitable. it's a LOT more accessible to a beginner, with fewer, cheaper consumables.

i personally can't wait to get a tig set but i half know what i'm up to with one and know mig well
tom
I've been doing this my entire life Tom
 

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I've been doing this my entire life Tom
hence you being happy to recommend tig. however, as a beginner, it's not the best way to start imho

i'll probably be able to offer a more rounded opinion when i get myself a tig set, probably this summer, but until then, a mig and a linishing wheel will do me.
tom
 

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we have a consumables counter at work, we are agents for BOC and have a cylinder compound for them, will try to post up some prices of welding sets,and rods and wire ect, we also sell shields gauntlets and mig and tig spares,wire brushes,chipping hammers, cylinder keys ect ect,will of course calculate a nutz discount should anyone need anything,

as said forget welding aluminimum, the tig sets capable of this are well expensive, you cant just use any tig set.
 

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I've been doing this my entire life Tom
hence you being happy to recommend tig. however, as a beginner, it's not the best way to start imho

i'll probably be able to offer a more rounded opinion when i get myself a tig set, probably this summer, but until then, a mig and a linishing wheel will do me.
tom
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Tom - with the greatest respect, I wouldn't even think about trying to tell you how to build a kit car mate.........trust me, go for the TIG & save yourself time & money
 
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