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I'm yet to find a wire you can't cut and join up again, and I'm an electrician.
Years ago I was an auto electrician, and back then you would find resistive cable to suppy coils 9v rather than 12. That sometimes tripped people up, but you won't find that on a 5

I wonder how many people have followed the pictorial above to the letter, only to utter the words 'tossers'
 

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I'm yet to find a wire you can't cut and join up again, and I'm an electrician.
Years ago I was an auto electrician, and back then you would find resistive cable to suppy coils 9v rather than 12. That sometimes tripped people up, but you won't find that on a 5
I wonder how many people have followed the pictorial above to the letter, only to utter the words 'tossers'
Ever come across that crap experiment to use aluminium core cable, circa 1950's IIRC.
I might be wrong but wasn't it the lambda sensor cables that wouldn't solder on a '5

Have you got a pictorial where the word tossers will not come into the equation?
 

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I'm yet to find a wire you can't cut and join up again, and I'm an electrician.
Years ago I was an auto electrician, and back then you would find resistive cable to suppy coils 9v rather than 12. That sometimes tripped people up, but you won't find that on a 5
I wonder how many people have followed the pictorial above to the letter, only to utter the words 'tossers'
Ever come across that crap experiment to use aluminium core cable, circa 1950's IIRC.
I might be wrong but wasn't it the lambda sensor cables that wouldn't solder on a '5

Have you got a pictorial where the word tossers will not come into the equation?
[/quote]

I would definitely like some answers from Mr Friendly, you seem to be humbugging the method I posted up and I would like an explanation please and also what you consider (as an expert) is the correct and best way to do the job.
 

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Sorry, it was a humourous comment for thoes that have actually done it. Whoevers work your copying has made a school boy mistake. They have broke it down in to stages it would appear, but there not in order. If you run this job through in your mind, it is not possible.

It is the heat shrink tube. As this set of drawings is for people that need this much help, it should show the tube being slipped on before the wires are connected. This may seem pedantic, but if you need them drawings your going to follow them blindly. Leading to the "bollox" moment.

As I am now addressing this from a technical viewpoint, not just giggling with my peers, I should point out the twisting is a bit hash. You should have both cores bent as hooks around eachother to give mechanical strength before the soldering. It is just good practice. Also soldering is bad practice. It may look neat all sleaved up, but it is a weakness. Wires snap where they leave the solder through firtigue, and often rot in damp conditions due to flux residues staying active.

Alloy cable in a car is no good. It is poor cable and should not be used as flex. It should only be used in fixed installations with low vibration. Failures are hard to spot, with cables that look fine just turning to dust before your eyes.

But hay, I was just having a laugh. It is not your work is it? It is ok, just not right for this job.
 

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I'm yet to find a wire you can't cut and join up again, and I'm an electrician.
Years ago I was an auto electrician, and back then you would find resistive cable to suppy coils 9v rather than 12. That sometimes tripped people up, but you won't find that on a 5
I wonder how many people have followed the pictorial above to the letter, only to utter the words 'tossers'
Ever come across that crap experiment to use aluminium core cable, circa 1950's IIRC.
I might be wrong but wasn't it the lambda sensor cables that wouldn't solder on a '5

Have you got a pictorial where the word tossers will not come into the equation?
[/quote]

I would definitely like some answers from Mr Friendly, you seem to be humbugging the method I posted up and I would like an explanation please and also what you consider (as an expert) is the correct and best way to do the job.
[/quote]

Well I found it funny...
And then simply slide the heat shrink on... F**K!!! HAHA
 

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That's fine, it only takes a little common sense to realise that if you have connectors etc, you slide heatshrink on first. The example pic only show open ended wires.
The hook and solder method is another good way but I have seen plenty of "leaded" joins like this in botch jewellery repairs and the joins break too easily.
Both methods are susceptible to fatigue failure through movement and vibration and both fall down when you forget the heatshink or it's dropped off unnoticed. I just personally think the twist method will take an occasional bending better.
 

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My god, this is all a bit deep and cut throat for just joinimg wires, ok i understand the need to have the info in simple to follow terms because of the mistakes that can be made, most twist the wires and lead load, heatshrink needs to be cut to size and slipped onto either side of the cable for soldering, once soldered the heatshrink can be passed over the join and heat applied to cover it nice and neat ,safe and a solid connection, scotch/snap clips are a weaste of time.
As said ................COMMON SENSE.

M-m
 

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If a wire didn't like being joined, what would happen at the end of it. How would it connect to anything.

There are some annoying wires. Lintz wire used in speaker construction. Many ht cables. Enamelled windings. There all a bit annoying to work with. There all in use though, so they can all be terminated.
 
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