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So I'm going to make my own heatshield for my turbo. A thread on here recently talked about "upgrading" from aluminium to copper but from what I understand would this not be the WORST material to make a shield from?

In terms of thermal conductivity (ignore the scale but higher numbers are MORE conductive and lower numbers less so) Copper is up around 400, Aluminium and some alloys similar to it are around 200 but stainless steel is between 12-20.

Am I right in saying that for a heatshield you want the minimum amount of thermal conductivity as otherwise a lot of the heat will be transmitted into the rest of the engine bay and 1)ruin intake temps 2)ruin things like washer bottle/LC-1???

Therefore you want something with very low conductivity. That's why they fill double glazing with argon as it has a conductivity of <1.

Am I right or very wrong?! A ceramic heatshield would be best but impossible to DIY!

What thickness of steel do people think would be sensible and how hard/easy is it to work with? I'm not blessed with space/tools but have a jigsaw with blades for steel, a workbench, a heatgun and perseverance! Can I achieve this?

Cheers
 

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I think you misunderstand from what you've read.

Copper is used as a heat-sink on LC-1 installs. It draws heat into itself as it's more conductive and disipates it using the free flowing air around it.

A heat-shield is exactly that, so you want it to resist heat conductivity.
 

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steel is probably your best bet, preferably some nice shiny stainless stuff. the FM heatshield I have is made from sheet stainless steel, couple of milimetres thickness, something like that should be easy enough to work with, just need to bend & shape it, then tack it or rivet it..

there was a thread on here a while back where soeone used a stainless pan as a heatshield.
 

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I think you misunderstand from what you've read.

Copper is used as a heat-sink on LC-1 installs. It draws heat into itself as it's more conductive and disipates it using the free flowing air around it.

A heat-shield is exactly that, so you want it to resist heat conductivity.
I don't quite get what you're saying then...if I want it to resist conductivity then is stainless steel not better than copper as it is much less conductive?

Why do I want a heatsink as opposed to a heatshield?

edit - the point of this is to shield the rest of the engine from the excess heat created by the turbo...
 

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A heatsink is usually a peice of copper or aluminium (typically with fins - like a computer CPU heatsink) which is used to remove heat to the atmosphere from the device it is attached to. An example of this is the copper plate that some attach to the LC-1, copper is used in preference to aluminium as it has a higher thermal conductivity thus allowing it to be more isothermal - conducting heat away from the hot centre where the LC-1 is fitted and into the atmosphere.......

A heatshield is usually a peice of shiney metal that reflects heat, like a peice of shiney foil some people put behind a radiator in a household, it is used as a thermal barrier to block radiated heat and reflect it away - an example of this is when you get close to a bonfire, you can feel it heating your face and if you bring your hand over your face you "sheild" it and your face doesnt get hot anymore....
 

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Heat sheild you have it right. Shiney steel is spot on.

The heat sink for the lc1 is simply copper plate with two bent up wings, the copper takes heat away from the sensor, and the wings put this into the air by the cool air running past them.

That's my understanding anyway. I'm not sure wether to make a sheild or relocate my air filter. I'm supercharged though so less heat than turbo.
 
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