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#1 Daz

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 10:01 AM

Ok, here it is for your delectation :)

Off you pop....

Daz
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#2 wbabbington

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 10:33 AM

A

Actuator

This device simply opens the turbochargers wastegate when it sees a pre-set pressure. It consists of a diaphragm attached to a rod which in turn is connected to the wastegate.

what one looks like : Posted Image

B

Bank Manager

your best friend or your worst enemy this is the person who most needs convincing that you need to go faster

C

D

E

Electronic Boost Controller

Similar to the MBC - but rather than manual adjustment, a solenoid is connected up to a digital control panel.

This control panel usually is inside the cabin and allows the operator to make changes to the levels of boost produced on the move.

NOTE: You cannot reduce the boost levels to that less than the actuator is set to.

where to buy one : http://www.whifbitz....lectronics.html

What one looks like : Posted Image

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

Manual Boost Controller

(Also known as MBC / Dawes device / Bleed valve)

This device intercepts the pipe from the turbocharger to the actuator and basically 'bleeds' off some of the pressure that the actuator sees. The amount of pressure bled can be adjusted. This basically means that the actuator will not open the wastegate so soon meaning the turbo will produce more boost.

Where to buy one : http://www.driftwork...inetuning-turbo

What it looks like : Posted Image

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Wastegate

This is a little 'flap' on the back of the turbo which is opened when the actuator sees a pre-set pressure from the turbocharger. This system is set up to ensure that the pressure produced by the turbo is limited to prevent overboosting which would no doubt lead to destruction of the turbo or the engine itself.

This excess pressure is simply vented to the exhaust system.

what one looks like : Posted Image

Wideband O2 Sensor

Fits into exhaust system either via a pre drilled hole in manifld/exhaust or by welding in a bung. Enables the user to regulate how rich/lean the exhaust gasses are, helping them to tune their car.

X

Y

Z
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Posted Image

Will - Currently running a different set of wheels, but still rear wheel drive!

#3 Daz

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Posted 27 February 2007 - 01:38 PM

Thank me later :P:

A

Actuator
The actuator on a turbo system will, when a certain pressure is reached, push a small rod (the actuator rod) which in turn opens the wastegate allowing the exhaust gases to escape.

Some actuators have adjustable rods, meaning if the driver wanted to increase/decrease the amount of boost the turbo produced, all he/she would need to do is adjust the actuator.
(Submitted by Sausages)

AFM

Air Flow Meter sensor (mk1 1.6). A flap in the MAF is connected to a variable resistor that feeds air flow signals to the ECU - also measures incoming air temp
(Submitted by BENX5)

AFPR (ADJUSTABLE FUEL PRESSURE REGULATOR)
A mechanical device fitted inline in the fuel pipes to increase the fuel pressure. Basic form of fuelling for an FI'd car.
(Submitted by Daz)

A/F ratio (air to fuel ratio)
The air to fuel ratio is the proportion of air to fuel during combustion.
In an NA car, a ratio of around 14-15:1 is optimal (14-15 parts air to 1 part fuel) however in a FI car, a ratio of around 12:1 is ideal. Some say peak power is made somewhere between around 12.0 and 13.5 AFR for both FI and NA. But this depends on each engine setup. ie an AFR of 13 might yield the most power, but due to excessive EGT the engine melts One advantage of WI is that you can go leaner and access more power - but you need to be extremely confident in your setup!

Lower AFR are generally applied in FI situations to combat the inherently higher EGT's and pressure - to avoid scorching valves and prevent knock.

(Submitted by Sausages and MI5)



B

BBR
Brodie Brittain Racing. Mazda approved turbo conversion for Pre '94 1.6's

(Based on a T25 turbo with a boost activated piggyback BBR interceptor ECU (this added fuel and altered timing when on boost - allowed for keeping good base timing too). It has a behind-the-rad small intercooler and most have oil coolers too. 150bhp/150torque standard, but lots suffer from boost drop off at high rpm becuase of the actuators starting to fail. Early ones also suffered the manifolds cracking like the GReddy's, the solution was cutting slots between num 2-3 exhaust ports to allow for heat expansion)
(Submitted by BBR-RB)

BEGI
Stands for the turbo engineering company name "Bell Engineering"
(Submitted by Sausages)


Bipes
is an American bloke (Dick Bipes), who invented the MSD timing controller and later the Bipes ACU (which does the same thing, but it's programmable and has more inputs). It's basically a device to retard timing when on boost.
(Submitted by Daz)

Bleed valve (sometimes known as a dawes device)
A small device that works in a very similar way to the EBC by hiding the pressure that actuator sees. Where it differs from the EBC is that it is a manual solution in the respect that you have to adjust a small screw to adjust the boost.
(Submitted by Sausages)

Boomslang harness
Premade harness used in the installtion of piggyback ECUs that allow the installer to simply plug one end of the harness into the ECU and the other into the piggyback unit.
(Submitted by Sausages)

BOV (Blow Off Valve)
On a turbo'd car, when you shut off the throttle, boost is still travelling towards the throttle plate - because it's shut, the compressed air is forced back on itself and hits the turbo's blades causing them to stall (puts lots of stress on the turbo too) - a BOV releases this by either venting it to atmosphere, or recirculating it.
(Submitted by BBR-RB)

BRP IPA upgrade

The BR performance Idler Pulley Assembly pgrade is an innovative bracket which replaces the OEM belt tensioner system on supercharged motors. The IPA allows the belt to be tensioned more easily and cures many of the alignment issues inherent with the BRP and Jackson supercharger packages. It also makes changing belts easier. A similar design is used by Track Dog Racing. This system also features an angled fixed idler pulley which enables the DIY tuner to erradicate belt alignment issues entirely.

Avoid the powdercoated versions as they are known to be problematic. Also ensure that you use longer bolts with either system as it is possible to strip the threads from the mounting holes when re-using stock bolts. The correct bolt sizes for the three mounting points are M10 x 1.25 x 35mm
(Submitted by BENX5)

C

CAI (cold air induction)
For every 3 degree celcius drop in intake temperature approximately 1 bhp of power is gained. This is often achieved by isolating or boxing off the air filter and supplying a cold air source via a scoop and ducting or with the addition of extra air vents. CAI is more beneficial in forced induction systems as these tend to heat up the intake charge.
(Submitted by BENX-5)

Coldside
placing the supercharger on the intake manifold side. The primary benefit is the reduction in throttled volume and better throttle response.
(Submitted by wbabbington and Daz)

Cooler rated spark plugs
These are essential in an FI engine. Boost = Heat. You cant run standard plugs in an FI engine. NGK BKR7E-11's are widely recommended while others prefer NGK Iridiums. NGK Iridiums are more expensive but more durable too. Boost = heat. You cant run standard plugs in an FI engine
(Submitted by BENX5)

Con Rods
Connecting rods. These connect the pistonhead to the crank. Built engines usually have much stronger connecting rods and lower compression pistonheads. This allows higher powered FI engines to operate in safety. It is generally agreed that most standard MX5 engines can safely handle 240 - 250 bhp or around 260 lb/ft torque which equates to around 12 - 15 psi of intercooled boost. Above these levels major engine re-building is necessary.
(Submitted by BENX5)

D

De-Cat pipe
Replacing the catalytic convertor with a straight through pipe so less restrictions are presented. This is only MOT legal on pre 1994 cars.
(Submitted by BENX-5)


DET Detonation (see knock)

DLL or Data Log Lab http://www.dataloglab.com/

An advanced but user friendly piece of Windows software which allows you to edit and upload your link maps and other parameters to the Link ECU via a serial cable. Also downloads datalogs from the ECU when you are driving for review later, with something like 40 parameters to review including things like Intake temp, boost, ignition timing, Injector duty cycle, coolant temp,AFR etc
(Submitted by lloydie)

Dual Feed Fuel Rail
This dual-feed fuel rail distributes fuel more evenly between the cylinders to give a greater safety margin and more power for boosted cars, mainly used on cars running big boost and larger injectors and stops cylinder #4 from running lean (a common problem on high boost supercharged and turbo MX5 engines)

You can modify the current OEM fuel rail to become Dual Feed by following a simple procedure.

Remember there is a significant difference between the fuel rails on the MK1 and MK2 and some later MK1's require a MK2 fuel rail due to the difference in the design.

Vishnu used to be the main suppliers but have now stopped producing them, BRP, 15psi.com are good places to start when looking for one. Flyin Miata are currently in the process of designing a new one for the MX5 (2006)
(Submitted by JuzzyP)


E

EBC (electronic boost controller)
This device sits between the turbocharger and actuator and essentially 'hides' the pressure that the actuator sees. Meaning that if the driver wanted to set the boost higher than the actuator would normally allow, this is possible.
(Submitted by Sausages)

ECU (Electronic Control Unit)
The electronic brain that controls all the electronic functions of your car, including ABS, Engine diagnostics and ignition
(Submitted by greg D)


eManage
electronic piggyback fuel computer, fully programmable with 16x16 maps for fuelling and ignition (16x16 meaning 16 points on the X axis (always RPM), 16 points on the Y axis (throttle position, manifold pressure, airflow)
(Submitted by Daz)

eManage Ultimate (EMU)
the second generation eManage, commonly known as EMU. Major improvements over the Blue eManage include : complete control over injectors, allowing bigger injectors to be used without affecting ignition timing ; several additional sensor inputs, such as water temperature, WBO2 ; autotuning ; launch control ; additional outputs for relays/warning lamps ; rev limit raising ; actual ignition timing logging ; on board data logging.
(Submitted by MI5)


F

FI
Initials for 'forced induction' representing the addition of a turbo or supercharger to your engine setup.
(Submitted by Sausages)

FM
Initials for the american company name "flyin' Miata"
(Submitted by Sausages)


G

Greddy
supplier of turbo's and normally the cheapest way into the world of FI for the MX5. Start up kit is normally good for about 5psi, but certain modificiations are needed to ensure reliability, such as bolts being replaced and relief cuts made in the manifold.

Can be upgraded relatively easily but can work out costly if high power is your ultimate goal.
(Submitted by wbabbington)

H

Header
The part of the exhaust that exits the engine. 4-1 means four pipes merge to one after a short run (good peak power), 4-2-1 means four pipes converge to two and then into one further down (good mid range power). Note some headers are not suitable for SC applications due to their shape and size. The header offers the least in terms of exhaust related power gains but is worth changing before you install a supercharger should you decide to upgrade it.
(Submitted by BENX-5)

Heat soak

This is where engine heat radiates into an intercooler. The intercooler then actually warms the charge until enough air has moved through the core to cool it down again. It can lead to short bursts of pre-ignition under certain conditions, for example pulling away hard after being stuck in traffic on a hot day.
(Submitted by BENX5)

I

Intercooler
Just like a radiator does for water, so an intercooler does for the air from the turbo. As the compressed air leaves the turbo its pretty hot, 80 or 90 degrees C is not uncommon. This heating effect is a by-product of compressing the air, and also becuase the turbo is a giant heatsink for the heat in the exhaust passing through it. High temperature air is less dense than low temperature air so per stroke of the engine, you get less air into the cylinder. Less air = less power, but also hotter air increases the risk of detonation or knock (see under K).
An intercooler is placed in the flow of air from the turbo to the throttle, and positioned in the mouth of the car. Because of its large surface area, and 'radiating' fins, the heat can be drawn from the air and typically the exit temperatue of the intercooler will be marginally above ambient temp. The car will make more power for the same amount of boost. You may even have to add more fuel if the intercooler does its job particularly well, as there wont be enough fuel injected for the larger volume of air in the cylinder (we are trying to maintain a 12:1 mix or thereabouts of air to fuel under boost).
Sizing an intercooler is important - too small wont cool the charge sufficiently, too large will add too much volume between the turbo and the throttle and lead to turbo lag. The biggest is not always the best ! For turbos like the Greddy and HKS kits, and even the FM kits, a cooler of around 40x40cm is adequate up to 10 or 12psi; its maybe even a little large. As you increase the boost (and require more cooling) or upgrade to a larger turbo, then think about upsizing the intercooler to suit.
(Submitted by lloydie)


J

JRBTC
The Jackson Racing Boost Timing Contoller allows a 3 dimensional timing curve. It looks at boost, rpm and timing. It only retards on boost (up to 2 degrees ignition retard per pound of boost) and advances the timing wherever possible. For example there is no need to retard ignition timing under boost and below 3.5k rpm. It is adjustable from inside the cockpit through the use of a convienient dial (most put these in the glovebox). For each clockwise click of the dial, one 10th of a degree of timing is retarded. Can be used in conjunction with emanage.
(Submitted by BENX-5)

JRSC
Jackson Racing supercharger. Somewhat small but has plenty of potential up to about the 200bhp mark on an MX-5. Only supercharger available for a 1.6, also available for a 1.8
(Submitted by Daz)

JR DTB (Jackson Racing Dummy Throttle Body)
Because the throttle must be re-located on PD blowers, Jackson Racing have manufactured a replica throttle body which resumes many of the original functions of the throttle with the exception that it does not contain a throttle butterfly. It is heated with coolant and has functioning vacuum lines attatched to it.
(Submitted by BENX-5)

K

Knock
killer of FI'd engines. Also known as preignition and pinking, it's where the air/fuel mixture combusts before it should, which can damage the pistons and cylinder head. Serious knock can destroy an engine in a very short amount of time.
(Submitted by Daz)


L

LAG (turbo Lag)
time taken for the turbo to spool up / spin up enough to make boost. larger turbos are generally more Laggy.
(Submitted by mx5turbo)

Link ECU

Its getting a bit old now, and has recently been replaced by the Hydra, but the Link powerd more FI'd MX5s and Miatas than any other ECU.
Made by Link Electrosystems Ltd in Australia, the ECUs were adopted by Ray at Flyin Miata where he totally re-wrote the code and made it Miata/Mx5 specific, and rebranded it 'MiataLink' The code was developed over many many years and went through several iterations to reach the satge it has now. The ECU supports igntion and fuelling, together with boost control, intake temp related fuelling, but also allows the owner to continue to use all their standard equipment. Its also a direct plug and play with a minimal install.
Based on a 16x6 grid for fuel and the same for ignition, it allows precise mapping of both within 500rpm steps from idle up to 7500rpm and for boost pressures from idle (vacuum) up to 1.5bar.
The backup from FM is outsatanding and the user base is huge.
The Data Log Lab software, available seperately, allows editing of all the Link parameters from a Laptop, within a Wondows environment. Also availaible is RTLink which is real-time data aquisition software, again designed directly for the Miata with the Link ECU.
(Submitted by lloydie)

M

MAF
Mazda Hotwire Air Flow Meter (mk1 1.8 and all mk2). This is a pre heated wire whose resistance changes as it is cooled by incoming air flow. These changes are monitored by the ECU. More responsive than the AFM and less affected by orientation (AFMs dont like being the wrong way up)
(Submitted by BENX5)

Mapping
The process where a 'tuner' will edit the parameters of your timing/fuelling/airflow etc on your piggyback ECU (or alternative) to create the best balance between power/safety and economy.
(Submitted by Sausages)

MAP sensor
a way of getting an absolute pressure sensor signal to the eManage. Much more precise and easier to program to than airflow.
(Submitted by Daz)

MP62
Larger supercharger, capable of some pretty impressive figures. Only available for a 1.8.

MSD
Basic timing retard device - pulls timing from a boost signal input. Allows for more torque off boost than simply retarding timing to a base of 6-8 degrees.
(Submitted by Daz)


N

NA

Initials for Normally aspirated (sometimes naturally aspirated) meaning your car does not have the addition of a turbo or supercharger.
(Submitted by Sausages)

O

O2 clamp
stops the ECU operating in closed loop fuelling and leaning out the AFR when you go to boost.
(Submitted by MI5)


P

Turbo PCV valve
Positive cam ventilation valve. Basically prevents you from pressurising the cam cover. This may only be necessary if your existing PCV valve is broken. Since they are so cheap it is worth installing one. Recent evidence suggests that OEM PCV valves allow the cam cover to become pressurised at anything above 4 psi.
(Submitted by BENX5)

PD superchargers (Positive displacement)
Roots type SC's are positive displacement blowers that move air without excessive compression. The result is a more linear output over wider rev range. These require fairly high rotational speeds to function - from 6,000 to 15,000 rpm.
The M45 SC moves 45 cubic inches of air with each rotation regardless of what is happening downstream of the SC. The larger MP62's move 62 cubic inches of air per rotation. Because of this, throttles must be placed up stream (air filter side of charger) so that no restrictions occur other than the engine itself.
(Submitted by BENX-5)

Piggy Back ECU
a device that is wired into the OEM ECU that allows the user to alter certain parameters and therefore changing the way the engine runs, such as improving efficiency and/or power. However it can be limited in what can be achieved as opposed to a full replacement ECU.

For examples see E-manage and EMU.
(Submitted by wbabbington)

Play (Ref: Turbocharger)
This is a term used to determine the state of the internals of the turbocharger. Play is identified as the horizontal or vertical movement of the shaft. Play can also be used to describe the 'in and out' movement of the shaft.

Depending on the turbo, play is a sign that the turbo may have seen better days, however on some applications, a mm or two of play is acceptable as the shaft spins of a thin layer of oil.
(Submitted by Sausages)


Q


R

RTLink

Free (!) software available from FM that allows realtime monitoring of all the data exported from the Link ECU to your laptop AS IT HAPPENS. Shows which fuel and igntion zones you are in at any one time, plus a user configuarble display of any of the Link parameters you wish to display - even displays in large type so you can see when you;re driving (not recommended). You can now monito AFR in realtime, together with boost and intake temp, for example.
Makes tuning all the 16x6 zones a doddle as you can see which zones you have 'visited' in your drive so far, and drive accordingly to visit other zones that need tuning. Coupled with Data Log Lab, it allows realtime mapping and manipluation of data, plus detailed logging facilites and ECU editing.
(Submitted by lloydie)

S

Stoich
Stoich refers to the 'Stoichiometric ratio'
This ratio represents the chemically optimal mix of fuel and air where they perfectly balance each other out. Stoich is the ideal in any internal combustion engine for optimum performance.
(Submitted by Sausages)

T

Torque & BHP (Description of)
If you have a big socket wrench with a 2-foot-long handle on it, and you apply 50 pounds of force to that 2-foot handle. What you are doing is applying a torque, or turning force, of 100 pound-feet (50 pounds to a 2-foot-long handle) to the bolt. You could get the same 100 pound-feet of torque by applying 1 pound of force to the end of a 100-foot handle or 100 pounds of force to a 1-foot handle.

Similarly, if you attach a shaft to an engine, the engine can apply torque to the shaft. A dyno measures this torque. You can easily convert torque to horsepower by multiplying peak torque by rpm then divide by 5,252.

In order to describe how quickly a car will accelerate to its top speed we need to look at the total area under the torque curve (torque plotted against RPM on a graph). In order to decribe how fast a car will tavel at its top speed we need to look at the cars bhp, weight and final gear ratio.
(Submitted by BENX-5)

TPS
Throttle position sensor. Two types: mk1 1.6 has a basic 'on/off' switch which allows the ECU to cut fuel if no air movement is sensed. It also tells the ECU when the throttle is near WOT.

The 1.8 engines (and mk2 1.6) have a variable TPS which enables the ECU to monitor throttle position more accurately in any position. This version enables more tuning potential through e-manage. Please see Tritium's thread for instructions on how to convert the mk1 1.6 TPS to variable.
(Submitted by BENX5)
U


V


W

Wastegate
A wastegate in simple terms is a small valve inside the turbo that diverts gases away from the turbine, causing it to lose speed. As the turbine will then be spinning slower - the compressor will also spin slower and will therefore produce less boost.

Wastegates are opened by an actuator (see actuator)
(Submitted by Sausages)


WI (water injection)
By injecting water into the intake charge it is possible to advance timing under boost. The main benefits of water injection occur in cylinder there are other benefits too but these are too numerous to mention here. Essentially the injected water conducts heat away from the cylinder walls far better than petrol does. This is an excellent way of preventing detonation in FI applications. Ideally the WI should be mapped via an piggyback ECU such as emanage but can be operated via a simple pressure / temperature switch.
(Submitted by BENX-5)


Wideband
A wideband oxygen sensor and controller will give you a far more accurate signal than a narrowband, essential for tuning.
(Submitted by Daz)

WOT
Wide open throttle.
(Submitted by BENX5)

X


Y


Z
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Don't ask me, I don't work here any more.

#4 BENX-5

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 10:09 AM

Glad this was rescued. Nice one!
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Siggy change! Yeay!


Brilliant black 1998, Supercharged, Aquamist Water/Methanol injected, NA 1.8 injectors, emanage, Jackson racing boost timing controller, Wide band tunable with LC-1, cold air induction system with separate scoop and isolation box (did ya like that one?), K&N 650CFM twin panelled filter, Flyin Miata High flow Cat, Flyin miata back box, Mazdaspeed engine mounts, Spec stage II Clutch, NGK iridium plugs, NGK 8mm leads, Autometer Air/fuel, Boost/Vac gauges, 16" OZ ultraleggeras wth Goodyear GSD 2 (rear) GSD 3 (front)

185 BHP, 147lbs Torque @ 9psi

#5 Jaydee5

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 04:49 PM

It hasn't helped me with what oil to use :(
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...must be something to do with the peculiar alchemy that comes with mixing a bunch of seemingly innocuous household substances, adding heat, et voila....out comes a cake!

#6 sausages

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 04:52 PM

thats because its a forced induction encylopedia and not an oil encyclopedia :P
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#7 Jaydee5

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 04:58 PM

thats because its a forced induction encylopedia and not an oil encyclopedia :P



:doh: I'm rubbish at this "search" milarky....sorry :oops:
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...must be something to do with the peculiar alchemy that comes with mixing a bunch of seemingly innocuous household substances, adding heat, et voila....out comes a cake!

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 07:32 PM

In order to decribe how fast a car will tavel at its top speed we need to look at the cars bhp, weight and final gear ratio

Maximum speed has little to do with mass, and a lot to do with frontal area and coefficient of drag. A heavy car will take longer to get there, and losses in the tyres/bearings will depend on its mass, but at high speed these are a fairly small part of the total force which must be opposed.

If aero drag is assumed to dominate, P=1/2*rho*A*Cd*v^3 where rho is the density of the air, A the frontal area and v the velocity. This is how Bonneville streamliner motorbikes do 200mph with 40bhp.
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